Great White Sharks
of
Isla Guadalupe, Mexico
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Isla Guadalupe is a protected marine area that lies 186 nautical, or 214
statue miles, off the Baja southeast of Ensenada, Mexico, and is a
gathering place for Great White Sharks.
All diving was from the a cage.
We sailed aboard the Nautilus Belle Amie for about 20 hours before setting anchor next to Isla Guadalupe.
(Sorry, I had to steal a picture of the boat, left, but the rest are my photos.)
Arriving just after sunset, the deck crew spent little time getting the cages into the water.
Air is supplied from a 'hookah system' for up to four in a cage.
Early morning and time to bring in the sharks with a little tuna. The idea was not to feed them, just get them interested.
A "Shark Wrangler" tossed a tuna chunk into the water tied to a rope which was pulled away as the shark approached,
at least that's the plan. Seems like they went through a couple hundred pounds of tuna while we were there.
There were five cages, two at the surface, and three submerged to 30 feet, and it was hard to decide where you might get the best pictures.
Each shark has a unique color pattern used to identify each individual. It was thought that we were visited by about 50
different individuals out of the known 300 that frequent the isle.
Each shark is given a name by the person that makes the first identification of a new individual and a photographic record is published each year to keep track.
I have not yet identified and discovered the names of all these sharks.
All of the sharks we saw ranged in size from perhaps 10 feet to as much as 17 feet in length.
Most of the sharks were females and most of them appeared to be pregnant. It is believed
that this might be a gathering place before going off to give birth.
All of these sharks were calm and seemed to be curious of us. There was no frenzy kind of
action, although one would occasionally grab the tuna chunk with a bit of force.
One of the largest sharks was this elderly gal named Lucy, identified by the broken tail.
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